Empowering YOU to be in control


We are what we eat- but is this why you are incontinent? read on to find out why.

No doubt most of us will decide to endulge in those little extras during the Christmas season, whether it is one too many glasses of our favourite drink or just that extra mince pie. Nobody wants to stick to vegatables and fruit during the winter months of Christmas, naturally as the weather gets colder our bodies need the extra fat, which is why during cold weather we tend to stock up on the carbs more than in the hotter months. We don’t even realise we are doing it. It is nature’s way of protecting us.

 Some food for thought comes from a study on energy intake and urinary incontinence in women.
Following on from a recent randomised trial confirming that weight loss significantly reduces the frequency of urinary incontinence (UI) episodes, researchers examined intakes of total energy, carbohydrate, protein, and fats in relation to UI in a cross-sectional sample of 2,060 women in the Boston Area Community Health Survey (2002–2005).
They found the ratio of saturated fat intake to polyunsaturated fat intake was positively associated with UI. Results suggest that dietary changes, particularly decreasing saturated fat relative to polyunsaturated fat and decreasing total calories, could independently account for some of the benefits of weight loss in women with UI.

Eating saturated fat increases systemic inflammation and causes endothelial dysfunction, both of which are involved with urological symptoms. The Mediterranean style diet, high in vegetables, fruit, legumes, nuts, whole grains and olive oil is effective in reducing the markers of inflammation.

So when you go to the doctor with a urinary incontinence issue, this is the reason he may ask you to lose weight. But easier said than done!

Lets look at what fats really are and how they are portrayed on products you buy.

Fat, also called lipid, is component of cell membrane and source of energy to the body. It is essential for brain development and production of cholesterol in the liver. However, when fat level in the body exceeds the normal level, it is associated with health complications such as heart diseases, high blood pressure and obesity.
The difference between saturated fats and unsaturated fats:

Saturated fat: are precursors for cholesterol and therefore, the level of their intake is positively associated with serum cholesterol level, especially low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. Major sources of saturated fat are animal food-based products; check the table below for content.

Unsaturated fat: includes polyunsaturated fat and monounsaturated fat. Both types are predominantly found in plant products. Examples of polyunsaturated fat food sources include soybean, sunflower, fish and corn oils. Monounsaturated fat is found in high content in olive, peanut, and canola oils. Polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fatty acids are suggested to lower low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol.

Several studies indicate that replacement of food high in saturated fatty acids with polyunsaturated or monounsaturated fat rich foods reduces the total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol.

In the following table is a list of fat food sources and their corresponding saturated fat and total fat content. With in each catagory, food items are listed high to low total fat content.

 You may see on the food pack the word lipid. Lipid is fat! Lipids are essential for brain development and production of cholesterol in the liver. No don’t even think about running out gorging on mince pies, red meat etc to increase brain delvopement. If only it did work like this. Too much of anything is a bad thing and likewise with Lipids. When there is effectively and overdose of lipid intake it then becomes a problem leading to medical conditions such as obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure and heart problems. 
The difference between saturated fats and unsaturated fats:

Saturated fat: are precursors for cholesterol and therefore, the level of their intake is positively associated with serum cholesterol level. Major sources of saturated fat are animal food-based products and the way these products are prepared, such as pork, beef and chicken. Fried, breaded, stewed etc.

Unsaturated fat: includes polyunsaturated fat and monounsaturated fat. Both types are predominantly found in plant products. 

Polyunsaturated fats sources include soybean, sunflower, fish and corn oils.

Monounsaturated fat is found in high content in olive, peanut, and canola oils. Polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fatty acids are suggested to lower low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol.

Several studies indicate that replacement of food high in saturated fatty acids with polyunsaturated or monounsaturated fat rich foods reduces the total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol.

Incontinence issues are here to stay unfortunately. There is a solution for some women. Incostress is a medical device which has been clinically trialled with positive results. Incostress is worn the same way as a normal tampon. It supports the urethra and bladder neck at the same time gently lifting the pelvic floor muscles. The support of the urethra controls the involutary loss of urine as the woman exceeds abdominal pressure through either sneezing or laughing or simply lifting something.

Incostress allows the woman to identify and carry out kegel exercises at the same time, which leads to stronger muscle control naturally. Strong pelvic floor muscles are needed for incontinence control, bladder support, better sexual feelings during intercourse. Keeping the pelvic floor in good shape can actually help keep the weight down around the abdominal area. Good strong pelvic floor muscles are essential to avoid prolapse. There is a lot of good FREE advice and dowloads on www.incostress.com

2 excellent books to help with incontinence issues and prolapse issues are Hold it Sister by leading physiotherapist Mary O’Dwyer her book can be found in WH Smith and Waterstones stores in the UK and Ireland and on www.holditsister.com as well as www.incoshop.co.uk 

Pelvic Organ Prolapse the silent epidemic by Sherrie Palm, prolapse expert can be found on www.sherriepalm.com

There are other good products such as kegal8 to help with bio feedback and pelvic floor strengthening. More about this product can be found on www.stressnomore.co.uk

In the first instance as there are different types of incontinence and different grades and types of prolapses  it is so important to speak to your physiotherapist or continence advisor and ask them what type of product is good for you.

I hope you found this information helpful. If you are thinking about surgery or simply don’t know what to do or who to speak to about your incontinence problem try looking at information sites such as www.incostress.com and www.bladderandbowelfoundation.org these are impartial sites with invaluable information.

Wishing you all a very happy Christmas and a very healthy 2011.

Comments on: "We are what we eat- but is this why you are incontinent?" (3)

  1. […] We are what we eat- but is this why you are incontinent? read on to find out why. No doubt most of us will decide to endulge in those little extras during the Christmas season, whether it is one too many glasses of our favourite drink or just that extra mince pie. Nobody wants to stick to vegatables and fruit during the winter months of Christmas, naturally as the weather gets colder our bodies need the extra fat, which is why during cold weather … Read More […]

  2. […] We are what we eat- but is this why you are incontinent? read on to find out why. No doubt most of us will decide to endulge in those little extras during the Christmas season, whether it is one too many glasses of our favourite drink or just that extra mince pie. Nobody wants to stick to vegatables and fruit during the winter months of Christmas, naturally as the weather gets colder our bodies need the extra fat, which is why during cold weather … Read More […]

  3. Hunting … Adventure or Dinner?…

    I found your entry interesting thus I’ve added a Trackback to it on my weblog :)…

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: